Tag Archive

Tag Archives for " dogs "

I comment on TikToki with aggressive dogs

I was browsing through Tik Tok recently and found a lot of funny and really cute dog videos, but I also found quite a few videos that shocked and saddened me. Unfortunately, many people, including those professionally working with dogs, still cannot read the signals sent by them. Ignoring calming signals, also known as early stress or threatening signals, leads to many unnecessary conflicts. So I thought it might be a good idea to give you my comments on some of the movies I found on Tik Toku.

The golden retriever is trying to bite the groomer

In the first video, the groomer looks after a 9-month-old Golden named Brooke as if nothing had happened. She bathes it, dries it, combs it, trims its fur … nothing unusual. However, already during drying, the dog jumps on the groomer, which was a big surprise for her. Later, when the groomer grabs the dog’s mouth with her hand and brings the scissors closer to him, Brooke tries to bite her. This behavior was also not expected by the groom. As he says in the film, the dog hadn’t shown any signs of aggression before, but was it really so good for the dog to take previous grooming treatments and suddenly tried to bite without warning?

Dog Tiktoki - The Golden Retriever is trying to bite the groomer

Not! The video clearly shows a series of calming signals that indicate the dog is stressed. Brooke clearly avoids eye contact with the groomer, turns her head, panting nervously, licks her nose. Additional stress may result in the dog being immobilized on a special grooming table and it is impossible to escape. We also do not know if Brooke was used to all these grooming treatments and grooming before. A dog will behave completely differently when the treatment is performed by a person he knows and trusts well than when it is done by a stranger.

Unfortunately, all signs of Brooke’s stress have been ignored here. If we do not react, when the dog calmly “talks” to us, it begins to “scream” loudly. In other words, when we ignore the calming signals, the dog may begin to show threatening or even aggressive signals, as with Brook.

Rottweiler likes to kiss?

In the next movie we see a girl trying to kiss her little bitch on the face. The bitch clearly does not like it and after a moment of threats she attacks the girl’s face. This scene is juxtaposed with a rottweiler growling loudly at a man kissing his face. The difference is that the Rottweiler does not attack him. In the description of the film, we can read that the dog’s growling is not even a warning signal.

tiktoki with dogs - Rottweiler likes to kiss?

In my opinion, however, this is a clear warning sign. The Rottweiler is tense, avoids eye contact with a man, licks his nose, shows proteins in his eyes, the so-called “Moon eye”, of course, it growls and shows its teeth. So it presents a series of calming and threatening signals at the same time. The only difference is he doesn’t attack… this time. The dog apparently has more patience with this type of human behavior than a small female, but that doesn’t mean it won’t attack in a similar situation in the future. And the consequences of a rottweiler attack can be much more serious than for a small female dog.

Child and German Shepherd

In the third film, we have a small child seated on a dog in the form of a German Shepherd. The child is very happy and so are his guardians, but what about the dog in this situation? You could say that the dog is also happy, because he smiles so widely, does not growl, does not attack the child … Unfortunately, from my perspective as a dog trainer and behaviorist, and from the dog’s perspective, it looks a bit different. The wide “smile” presented by the dog in this film is nothing more than nervous panting. When a child pulls his dog’s ears, bends over him, grabs his head, puts his fingers in his eye, the pooch shows a series of stress signals such as avoiding eye contact, turning the head, “moon eye” or licking his nose.

tiktoki with dogs - Child and German Shepherd

Unfortunately, many dog ​​parents and guardians fail to pick up on all these little signals or consciously ignore them. Because more important than the emotions of the dog is that the child has fun. Because you have to take a funny picture on social media, etc. Fortunately, in this video the dog did not attack the child, but if this happens again, it may eventually lose its patience. Unfortunately, the consequences of such an attack will most likely be borne by the dog, and not by its irresponsible guardians and guardians of the child.

Below I am throwing you a video with my full analysis of these three ticks. If you are interested in the subject of dog communication, please click and watch.

How often do we hear or read in the media that the dog has bitten without warning? Dogs send us various messages all the time. We just need to learn to read them and respond accordingly. I hope that posts like this one will help you understand your dogs even better and avoid the situations that I am describing here.

Do dogs feel guilty? Commenting on TikToki

Nobody would like to see a mess or a large pool of urine in the middle of the living room when they return home. Unfortunately, dog handlers sometimes have to face this reality. Many people get angry in similar situations. They tell the dog that he did wrong, they put bitten objects under his nose, etc. The dog reacts in such a situation with fear and shows a number of so-called calming signals, also known as stress signals. The dog crouches, avoids eye contact with the handler, puts his ears back, licks his nose, yawns. Some dogs raise the front paw or wag their tail nervously. If the stress level is very high and the dog feels that his life may be in danger, he can trigger one of five survival strategies. Most often, the pooch will just try to escape from a difficult situation, but he can also noticeably slow down his movements or even freeze motionless.

I have recorded a video for you with my commentary on tiktoków in which dogs show such behavior. However, do they prove that the dog feels guilty and knows that he did wrong? Will he exhibit undesirable behavior in the future when we punish him?

Do dogs feel guilty?

Dogs possess most mental abilities, including emotions, about the level of a two-to-a-half-year-old child. So they feel excitement, anxiety, contentment, disgust, fear, anger, joy, shyness, or attachment. On the other hand, emotions such as guilt, shame, pride or contempt are completely alien to dogs. What we often read as a dog’s guilt is actually fear. The dog, seeing our reaction, knows that something is wrong. However, he does not necessarily associate our anger with his previous behavior.

The development of emotions in a dog - graph

It is worth remembering that for the punishment to be effective, it must occur when the undesirable activity is performed by the dog or a few seconds later. Punishing a dog a few minutes or hours after the fact does not make any sense. The dog simply will not associate its behavior with its consequence, i.e. punishment. However, he will learn that when the guardian comes home and is very angry, it is better not to get in his way.

Research on guilt in dogs

Professor Alexandra Horowitz conducted an interesting experiment. The dogs’ keepers would put the treat on the ground and forbade their pupils to eat it, after which they left the room. Only the observer, who filmed his behavior, remained in the room with the dog. The dog could obey the guardian’s prohibition and leave a treat, or disobey and eat it. In addition, the observer sometimes took the treat from the ground himself without the knowledge of the dog’s handler. Before returning to the room, the handler was informed whether his dog had broken the command or not. This information was not always correct. Upon hearing of the obedience, the guardian was to greet the dog in a friendly manner, while the disobedience was to be punished with a verbal reprimand.

The dog gives up the treat

It turned out that the dogs’ behavior did not depend on whether they were obedient or not. It depended, however, on the behavior of their guardian. When the handler greeted the dog in a friendly manner, the dog was happy even when he ate the treat lying on the ground. On the other hand, when the handler punished the dog with verbal reprimands, the dog displayed behaviors interpreted by many people as guilty even when the dog obeyed and did not eat the treat.

Based on a similar study by a team of researchers in Hungary and Scotland, it has been established that the behavior of dogs when greeting a handler cannot be a reliable indicator of whether the dog has committed a “crime” or not. What about punishing dogs for destroying, pampering themselves at home or stealing food in our absence?

Destroying various items

When a dog has not been taught to be independent and stays home alone for many hours, it will look for ways to cope with increasing stress and anxiety. When biting or tearing objects apart, serotonin is released in your dog’s body. It is a hormone responsible for improving the dog’s mood, among other things. Destroying objects is therefore one of the stress coping strategies for dogs. If, after returning home, we scold the dog for the damage, we will not teach him this behavior. We can, however, increase his stress level and intensify unwanted behavior in the future.

The dog destroys the pillow on the bed

The dog can also destroy objects in the house out of sheer boredom. If we do not provide him with the right amount of movement and mental stimulation, he will be looking for ways to meet these basic needs. In this case, punishing the dog will also not stop it from destroying the apartment. Disease can also be a cause of chewing things. Many dogs find solace by chewing on various objects when they have digestive problems. Biting is also more severe in puppies who replace their teeth permanently. Neither punishing a sick dog nor a teething puppy will solve the problem of destroying items in your home.

Taking care of yourself at home

Another problem that dog handlers face is killing a dog while the handler is absent. There can also be many reasons for this behavior. Perhaps the dog has never been properly trained to clean and simply doesn’t know that he shouldn’t pamper himself at home. It is also possible that the dog had to wait too long for the next walk. Often, changing the diet, times of meals and walks causes the pooch to relieve himself at other times than usual. Many dogs kill themselves at home in the absence of their owners due to stress. You cannot forget about the diseases that make the pooch have to go outside more often.

The puppy took care of the carpet

Punishing a dog that is relieved of stress, because he is ill, because he has not been taught cleanliness or because he is taken too rarely for a walk will certainly not solve the problem. It can, however, aggravate your dog’s stress and make him pee at home even more often. A dog that is punished for taking care of himself in the house may also learn to eat his droppings. When there is no excrement, the person is not angry and there is no punishment. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to teach your dog this behavior later on.

Food theft

Some dogs just wait for the handler to disappear from sight to steal food from the table, kitchen countertops, or the garbage can. It’s important to know that this is a natural behavior for many dogs. In the canine world, as long as the dog eats or stands over food, the food belongs to him. However, when the pooch leaves him and ceases to be interested in him, everyone can come and take them. In the human world, the rules are slightly different. When we leave the sandwich on the table and go to another room for a while, we expect food to be waiting for us when we return. Due to these differences in human and dog habits, we often have unnecessary conflicts.

Of course, you can teach your dog not to move any food that is left for a while. However, it should be remembered that this behavior is not natural for the dog. We also cannot expect the dog to guess what rules prevail in the human world and to follow them perfectly. We cannot demand behaviors from the dog that we have not taught him before.

The dog wants to steal a chicken from the kitchen counter

If we have a dog that has experienced hunger in his life, his need to constantly get food can be very great. Punishing a dog for this behavior will not make it stop stealing food. Some dogs are constantly looking for food because they are just hungry. If we feed our dog with highly processed, poorly digestible food, even giving him large portions will not satisfy his nutritional needs. Punishing a dog that is hungry, lacking in its diet, or is sick will not suddenly make it stop stealing food.

How to fix the problem?

If your pooch destroys various items, takes care of things at home or steals food, the key to solving the problem is always finding its causes. Only when you know the causes of your dog’s undesirable behavior, you can try to change them. If the pooch destroys the apartment because he suffers from separation anxiety, it is worth taking him to the vet and to a behaviorist who will develop an individual plan for further therapy. On the other hand, if the dog destroys various objects at home out of boredom, increasing the number and intensity of walks and introducing additional mental stimulation in the form of olfactory games or learning the basics of obedience should solve the problem.

Likewise for dogs that mess around in the house or steal food. We first identify the causes of the problem, and only then consider how we can change the dog’s undesirable behavior. We will work differently with a dog that has not been trained to clean, and differently with a dog that has a sick bladder. One thing is for sure, yelling at your dog will not solve the root cause of the problem and will not change its behavior. However, it can negatively affect your relationship and your dog’s sense of security.

Sources

Coren S. (2013). Which Emotions Do Dogs Actually Experience? Psychology Today

Hecht J, Miklósi Á, Gácsi M (2012) Behavioral assessment and owner perceptions of behaviours associated with guilt in dogs. Appl Anim Behav Sci 139: 134-142.

Horowitz A (2009) Disambiguating the guilty look: salient prompts to a familiar dog behavior. Behav Process 81: 447–452.

Can Dogs Eat Shrimp And Is It Healthy For Them?

Can dogs eat shrimp? The short answer is yes. But there are some technical details that you need to be aware of. And as with all things in life, you should only be giving your dog shrimp in moderation. It can be a nice treat for your dog and beneficial to its diet.

Is It Okay for Dogs To Eat Shrimp?

The most important thing to be aware of, is that the shrimp has to be cooked properly. Raw shrimp contains dangerous bacteria that can cause shellfish toxicity. Your grocer might try to convince you that the shrimp is safe for sushi use, but this doesn’t mean it’s safe for your dog to consume.

Also, keep the amount of shrimp per feeding small. It’s only really an exotic treat for your dog, there are other much better protein sources such as salmon or tuna. But it is low in calories and dogs can digest shrimp quite easily. Shrimp is high in minerals that can help to strengthen bones and teeth, plus speed up a dog’s metabolism. Minerals found in shrimp include calcium, iron and phosphorous.

Another potential danger to be aware of, is that shrimp contains high cholesterol levels. If your dog is already struggling with its weight, rather stay clear of shrimp. It can also negatively affect your dog’s cardiovascular system.

Health Benefits of Shrimp

Can Dogs Eat Shrimp

Can Dogs Eat Shrimp

Can dogs eat shrimp and how healthy is it for them? Although shrimp is not a great source of proteins, it has other useful traits such as being high in antioxidants, including copper and selenium.

Plus a very special one, namely astaxanthin. This is a potent anti-inflammatory carotenoid. In animal studies it has been shown that this special antioxidant offers support to the nervous system as well as the musculoskeletal system. Research has furthermore shown that intake of astaxanthin decreased risk of diabetes and colon cancer. On average a single 4-ounce serving of shrimp can contain between 1 to 4 mg of astaxanthin.

Other vitamins and minerals contained in shrimp: vitamin A, vitamin B3, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin E, iodine, omega-3 fats, pantothenic acid, zinc, choline and protein.

Preparing Shrimp for Dogs

Keep your dog’s dietary needs and restrictions in consideration when preparing the shrimp. Stay clear of seasoning as excessive salt intake can be dangerous for dogs, causing their blood pressure to spike or leading to dehydration. Don’t fry the shrimp or cook it in butter, the fat can cause digestive upset and even inflammation of the pancreas. Do not add any garlic or onion powders.

Shrimp is not a dietary necessity for your dog. It can be a nice snack from time to time, but only in moderation. Check with your veterinarian first before feeding your dog shrimp on a regular basis.

Peel and Devein the Shrimp

Remove the veins before cooking. Use a knife or scissor to cut along the shrimp’s back and carefully pull out all the veins. Unpeeled shrimp can be dangerous for your dog. Try peeling it only after it’s cooked to make sure the shrimp doesn’t lose any nutritional value and to make sure you remove all of the shell.

A trick for pulling off the shell in one piece: slip your fingers under the shell, at the end of the shrimp head and carefully pull the shell away.

Take note: Always feed freshly cooked shrimp to your dog. The cooked shrimp will only last for about a day or two when refrigerated.

Can A Dog Eat The Tail and Shell?

No, it’s not recommended. They can create a stomach blockage or potentially be a choking hazard. Your dog’s ancestors did not have access to shrimp, so a dog’s teeth and digestive system is not equipped to deal with the outside of shrimp. Cleaned shrimp is much easier for your dog to digest.

Also, make sure you buy high quality shrimp. If the shrimp has any rings or black spots on the shell, it means the flesh has begun to deteriorate and break down. Stay clear of gritty or yellow shells. This indicates that chemicals such as sodium bisulfate has been used on the shrimp. If the shrimp smells like ammonia, it is spoiled.

Shrimp isn’t poisonous to dogs when prepared correctly, but your dog might be allergic to it. And if not cooked properly, it can cause shellfish toxicity. Read this article to be aware of dog allergy symptoms.

Your Dog Has Eaten Raw or Too Much Shrimp: What Now?

Can dogs eat too much or raw shrimp? In excessive amounts or when not cooked properly, your dog’s body will reject the shrimp. Your dog will most likely experience stomach discomfort, vomiting and diarrhea. The dog’s body will deal with the shrimp on its own. These symptoms should only last for about 24 hours. If they continue for longer, you will should consult your veterinarian.

You need to keep your dog hydrated while its body fights the foreign substance consumed. Make sure it has continues access to fresh water. Other than that, there’s not really anything else you can do to assist your dog. Read this article before you try inducing vomit in your dog.

Can Dogs Eat Shrimp – The Disadvantages

Shrimp contains lots of healthy vitamins and minerals, but there are a few drawbacks for your dog’s nutritional needs. As mentioned above, your dog’s ancestors did not have access to shrimp years ago, so their digestive system is not truly compatible with it.

One of the biggest drawbacks of shrimp, is the high cholesterol value. Four ounces of shrimp can contain up to 220 mg of cholesterol. So you need to keep it as an occasional treat, not a regular snack. The biggest health risk of shrimp is the potential shellfish toxicity it can cause, so you need to take extra precaution when preparing it. Make sure it is cooked properly before offering it to your dog. Introduce the shrimp gradually as a new treat to prevent stomach upset.

After feeding your dog shrimp for the first time, you need to keep a close eye on it. If it starts acting strange or showing allergy symptoms, immediately go to your veterinarian.Some dogs might love the taste, but others will just pull their noses up and refuse to try it.

Other Seafood That Are Safe for Dogs

Adding a little bit of seafood to your dog’s regular diet can be very beneficial. But emphasis on the “little bit”.

Salmon

A great extra source of protein. But it also needs to be cooked properly to deal with a parasite that causes Salmon Disease.

Tuna

Another great source of protein, but you need to keep in mind its high mercury and sodium content. Read this article to find out more about the health benefits.

Crab

Part of the shrimp family, but it contains a lot of iodine. Some dogs can be allergic to it and you don’t want to overdo it, the verdict is not quite out if it is truly safe for dog consumption.

Lobster, Clams, Oysters

Some more shellfish that can enhance your dog’s diet. But remember to not feed your dog the shells. The shells can cause puncture holes in your dog’s digestive system.

Conclusion: Can Dogs Eat Shrimp?

Feeding your dog shrimp can be a nice little healthy treat. Just make sure you follow the cooking instructions as described above. And remember to first test your dog’s reaction to the shrimp. It’s always best to first chat to your veterinarian to make sure a new addition to your dog’s diet will be beneficial.